Progress continuum – demonstrating student progress easily

Presenting and sharing lesson objectives and demonstrating the ladder of skills in your subject are crucial in demonstrating student progress as this provides a starting point for your lesson from which you can judge student progress. David Didau, in his The Perfect English OFSTED Lesson, has advocated the continuum method in presenting his objectives which show not only the subject specific knowledge you want to cover but also the progression in skills which are linked to National Curriculum levels or exam grades. The examples contained in the links below shows the continuum method applied in a History context.

Progress continuum – Winner of Cuban Missile Crisis

Progress continuum – the Norman Conquest

Progress continuum – Castles

Not only can you use this for presenting learning objectives but you can use this as a ‘progress continuum’, where students are given this when you return marked assessments. Using your feedback, students colour the arrow up to the point where they reached [e.g. If their work was marked at Level 5, they colour the arrow up to the Level 5 mark on the arrow, then they set themselves a target based on your comments and the level descriptors on the ‘progress continuum’. Also, I mark their work with the continuum in front of me, reminding me of the language to use when giving feedback.

Presenting learning objectives and the path of progress in this way includes differentiated outcomes in which the first box outlining the baseline skill that you expect every student to achieve and then the following boxes outline the development of skills that you expect students to work towards. This also provides students with a clear overview of the progression of skills that you expect them to work towards as well as provide them with the key vocabulary that they can use to describe their progress.

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One thought on “Progress continuum – demonstrating student progress easily

  1. Pingback: Progress continuums AQA History 2016 1B Germany 1890 – 1945 | Littlestobbsy's Blog

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